Welcome to Petroleum Geology Forums

This is a free online community that aims to bring petroleum professionals and geologists together and share valuable knowledge. Registration is easy so become a member now for instant free access.
  • Petroleum Geologists can stay up to date with industry related topics and exchange ideas and concepts.
  • Upstream Oil and Gas Consultants get a chance to share their expertise and gain exposure to land future projects.
  • Geology students and graduates can join the discussion and get into contact with potential future employees.

  >> Register Now





Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 5 posts ] 
What software would you like to see? 
Author Message

Joined: Thu Apr 14, 2011 7:43 pm
Posts: 12
Location: Aberdeen
Post What software would you like to see?
Hi all,

This is my first post on the forums so hope to contribute as have been searching for a place like this for a while now.

Was wondering whether you believe that there is specific software that you would like to see on the E&P side of Geology that would make your jobs/interests easier or whether you think there's a bit of over-saturation and that most ideas have pretty much been made and can only be improved on. Is there anything you think could improve the accuracy/time of tasks etc?

I'm currently a final year BSc Geology student and I'm undertaking an MSc Computer Science next year but am not too up to date with what kind of software is out and about/widely used.


Thu Apr 14, 2011 7:48 pm

Joined: Wed Sep 01, 2010 10:06 pm
Posts: 107
Post Re: What software would you like to see?
Welcome to the forums!

Basically, it's a jungle out there with a lot of software packages that offer an immense range of functionality. Most service companies (Halliburton, Schlumberger, Backer Hughes) offer complete packages to cover all that is needed throughout the Geoscience process. I only am involved with Petrel (Schlumberger) and can actually do (almost) everything I need to do from within a single program (with multiple modules). Other disciplines might need to use a range of different software from different providers. And it you start touching on finance, planning, HR, logistics, refining, marketing, etc than you obviously open up an ever larger software portfolio all operators need.

I do feel software development is a very active department in most mayor companies and service providers and it is a very dynamic environment to work in and geology students with software/programming skills are in high demand. Most operators even have their own (confidential) packages that they keep in house due to obvious reasons. I can not tell you what software or functionality is generally missing, because others may already have it and, generally, whenever an idea springs up this is tailored for very quickly. I believe that not the IT (programming, processors, technology, etc) is holding back developments, but actually scientific research that forms the basis for this software development is holding advancement back.


Fri Apr 15, 2011 12:21 pm

Joined: Thu Apr 14, 2011 7:43 pm
Posts: 12
Location: Aberdeen
Post Re: What software would you like to see?
Petrel_user wrote:
Welcome to the forums!

Basically, it's a jungle out there with a lot of software packages that offer an immense range of functionality. Most service companies (Halliburton, Schlumberger, Backer Hughes) offer complete packages to cover all that is needed throughout the Geoscience process. I only am involved with Petrel (Schlumberger) and can actually do (almost) everything I need to do from within a single program (with multiple modules). Other disciplines might need to use a range of different software from different providers. And it you start touching on finance, planning, HR, logistics, refining, marketing, etc than you obviously open up an ever larger software portfolio all operators need.

I do feel software development is a very active department in most mayor companies and service providers and it is a very dynamic environment to work in and geology students with software/programming skills are in high demand. Most operators even have their own (confidential) packages that they keep in house due to obvious reasons. I can not tell you what software or functionality is generally missing, because others may already have it and, generally, whenever an idea springs up this is tailored for very quickly. I believe that not the IT (programming, processors, technology, etc) is holding back developments, but actually scientific research that forms the basis for this software development is holding advancement back.


Thank you very much for your reply. I have noticed that indeed there is a vast array of software packages for geologists in E&P. Would hope to target a niche market. For example atypical reservoirs. Problem is as it's only a final project it's not going to be a massive software system. Currently I'm looking at modelling thermal heat transfer from igneous emplacement into country rock as a possible mechanism of maturity. There are a few papers out there but from the software that I've seen, they all model instantaneous emplacement which is not entirely accurate in certain situations. Would just like to keep my options open and develop something that would actually get used, rather than just thrown on my CV as a past piece of work.

I am glad you have said there is a high demand for geologists with programming skills as when browsing for potential jobs I'm afraid I haven't seen too many, and for those I have seen the salary is nowhere near as competitive as those for full exploration geologists. I have seen a lot of jobs working with GeoFrame which I believe is also a product of Schlumberger so I'll definitely like to look at that.

I am really hoping that the Geocomputing field grows further in the next couple years, as a lot of the E&P geology work is still manual as algorithms for things such as seismic picking and interpretation are nowhere near the level they need to be at.


Fri Apr 15, 2011 12:58 pm

Joined: Wed Sep 01, 2010 10:06 pm
Posts: 107
Post Re: What software would you like to see?
Sounds like an interesting topic; how are you approaching it? Are you using 3D grids and expanding heatflow from a certain point source spatially or is it a 1D approach? Have you looked into heatflow models that use salt diapirs that are able to transfer heat upwards faster, as I imagine that could sort of be a similar approach.... but I generally don't deal with this stuff.

As for the jobs, I think the main reason you're not seeing many vacancies may be due to the fact that smaller companies generally are hired to develop software or plugins. They have less budget to hire recruiters and get their applications online. Also, they generally hire from within their network; it's often all about who you know.
Furthermore, I think that it's still pretty difficult to find geologists that have expert programming skills and the industry anticipates this by targeting their job offers on pure IT specialists first. But, the need to have a geological background when developing geoscience software is paramount I believe.
I wouldn't worry about the job market, it's picking up again and the fact that you are already thinking about your future options by trying to make useful software will percolate onto your cv; I'm sure!

I can not help you with ideas for software though, but you might want too look around the Ocean store (http://www.ocean.slb.com/Pages/category ... tegory=all) as this is a good indication of what sort of stuff is in demand (sorry, Petrel again). Also keep an eye on the BlueBack guys (http://www.blueback-reservoir.com) as they do exciting stuff. Furthermore you can get some pretty advanced seismic interpretation and modeling software for free to play around with from DGB (http://www.opendtect.org).

For more about maturation and basin modeling, Becip Franlab probably provides the most advanced package (http://www.openflowsuite.com/).

Good luck, and please let us know what you come up with!


Fri Apr 15, 2011 2:24 pm

Joined: Thu Apr 14, 2011 7:43 pm
Posts: 12
Location: Aberdeen
Post Re: What software would you like to see?
Petrel_user wrote:
Sounds like an interesting topic; how are you approaching it? Are you using 3D grids and expanding heatflow from a certain point source spatially or is it a 1D approach? Have you looked into heatflow models that use salt diapirs that are able to transfer heat upwards faster, as I imagine that could sort of be a similar approach.... but I generally don't deal with this stuff.

As for the jobs, I think the main reason you're not seeing many vacancies may be due to the fact that smaller companies generally are hired to develop software or plugins. They have less budget to hire recruiters and get their applications online. Also, they generally hire from within their network; it's often all about who you know.
Furthermore, I think that it's still pretty difficult to find geologists that have expert programming skills and the industry anticipates this by targeting their job offers on pure IT specialists first. But, the need to have a geological background when developing geoscience software is paramount I believe.
I wouldn't worry about the job market, it's picking up again and the fact that you are already thinking about your future options by trying to make useful software will percolate onto your cv; I'm sure!

I can not help you with ideas for software though, but you might want too look around the Ocean store (http://www.ocean.slb.com/Pages/category ... tegory=all) as this is a good indication of what sort of stuff is in demand (sorry, Petrel again). Also keep an eye on the BlueBack guys (http://www.blueback-reservoir.com) as they do exciting stuff. Furthermore you can get some pretty advanced seismic interpretation and modeling software for free to play around with from DGB (http://www.opendtect.org).

For more about maturation and basin modeling, Becip Franlab probably provides the most advanced package (http://www.openflowsuite.com/).

Good luck, and please let us know what you come up with!


I'll be using a 2D Grid approach similar to a program known as Heat3D so that it represents a sort of cross section through the body and can measure the aureole. I haven't done much research on it yet except taking a look at the equations required and possible methods of design as I'm waiting for my supervisor to agree first.

I am still undecided on my career path as I want to go into both software but I'd still like to work on the rigs and among the operations themselves. I know I can't have both so maybe just a technical IT capable exploration geologist heh.

Thanks for the software suggestions I'll check them all out.


Sun Apr 17, 2011 1:59 pm
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 5 posts ] 


Related topics 
 Topics   Author   Replies   Views   Last post 
There are no new unread posts for this topic. best GIS software

avargas

2

1799

Sat Mar 19, 2011 12:58 am

avargas View the latest post

There are no new unread posts for this topic. Geosteering Software

RicardoTom

5

3109

Tue Sep 29, 2015 1:04 pm

James House View the latest post

There are no new unread posts for this topic. useful Petroleum Geology Software

Admin

5

7581

Fri Oct 16, 2015 8:13 pm

frabulator View the latest post

There are no new unread posts for this topic. FMI Interpretation Software

AlvieAR

1

1403

Fri Feb 14, 2014 3:16 pm

AdhamAla View the latest post

There are no new unread posts for this topic. Software for Well-logging and seismic data

FarukG

2

2110

Fri Sep 21, 2012 8:16 am

listmember View the latest post

 



Search for:
Jump to:  


Content on EPGeology.com is intended for personal use only and to supplement, not replace, professional judgment. EPGeology.com disclaims any and all liability for your use of its content. As most of our content is supplied by our users we can not check copyright, and stress that copyright remains at the original owner. If you suspect copyright infringement please use the contact form to report it.
Contact || © EPGeology.com. || Powered by phpBB Asteroid Mining

phpBB SEO